Rumors of drug targeting children found to be false

Although there have been many Facebook warnings about a form of meth that resembles pop rocks, those rumors have been found to be false.  photo credit: Super Cuppett via photopin cc

Although there have been many Facebook warnings about a form of meth that resembles pop rocks, those rumors have been found to be false.
photo credit: Super Cuppett via photopin cc

By Sarah Sanchez

A type of methamphetamine called Strawberry Quik, is a drug that many claim is targeted at children. Nakedsecurity.sophos.com claims that many say the drug looks like pop rocks and tastes like strawberries. The story is so catching that it has been spread across Facebook recently. The website shares that Facebook users are sharing warnings about this strawberry-flavored crystal meth.

A writer for the NakedSecurity website, Grahm Cluley stated, “The message, which is sometimes distributed with an image of what appears to be pink- coloured crystallized methamphetamine, claims that children are being targeted with drugs that taste of strawberries.”

Strawberry Quik has been a drug scare since 2007. Drug dealers were said to be disguising meth coloring and flavoring to make it more appealing to children. The case was widely spread throughout the media but no cases of children using flavored meth have been verified.

Donna Leinwand of USA Today reported candy-flavored meth stirring concern among police and abuse prevention experts because they believe drug dealers might be marketing this drug to younger people.

Webarticlesrus.com concluded that these rumors are false. They found that the story about ‘strawberry quik’ is a hoax. The website states that the Drug Enforcement Agency public affairs officer, Barbara Wetherell, has found no evidence to substantiate that Strawberry Quik or any other form of flavored meth exists.

The website also shows that in March 2007, the DEA announced it received reports of drug traffickers offering candy-flavored meth for sale in western and midwestern states from california to Minnesota in the form of colorful crystals resembling pop rocks.

As of June 2007, experts confirmed that local drug enforcement agencies may have confused samples of colored meth as a flavored variety of this drug.